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Urine In Trouble Now! Urine Podcast Episode

That’s right! A urine podcast! In this family podcast episode we’re covering how does pee work, why does asparagus make your pee smell, what in urine helps jellyfish stings, why is pee yellow (and other colors), and other fun urine facts for kids and parents to learn together!

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Learning About THE URINARY SYSTEM FOR KIDS!

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Highlights and Fact Corrections From the Urine In Trouble Now Episode:

*The Adam Ruins Everything episode that Ella refers to about peeing on jellyfish stings can be found here.

*The Friends episode where there is pee on a jellyfish sting is Season 4 Episode 1: “The One with the Jellyfish”

*Ella asks how long ago did friends come out? Friends first came out in September 1994.

*FUN TO DO: Order a Urine strip test kit (cheap on Amazon!) and test the pH level of everyone’s urine!

*Learn about jellyfish nematocysts (that sting!).

*Learn about the immortal jellyfish (Turritopsis dohrnii) that Ella talks about.

*Can the immortal jellyfish die? Although it “ages in reverse,” regenerates cells to continue living, and is “potentially immortal,” the immortal jellyfish can still be killed by predators.

*Ella asked, “Do jellyfish pee?” Jellyfish excrete waste through their mouth! (The same mouth they eat with! Gross.)

*No, asparagustic acid isn’t a Willy Wonka character. You can learn more about it here.

Urine Podcast Episode References and Resources

Urine In Trouble Now! Podcast Episode Transcript

Ella:

Welcome

Jackie:

To parent busters, a fun podcast where parents and kids can learn about weird things together. Oh, we’re Jackie and Ella. And today our episode is called urine trouble now.

Jackie:

Guess what today’s episode is about?

Ella:

I don’t know. What is it?

Jackie:

It’s clearly about urine, huh?

Ella:

Oh, okay. Yeah. Huh.

Jackie:

So before we get to anything else, we are going to give you our two truths and a lie.

[sound effect]:

Please hold for a very important message.

Ella:

Okay. So two truths and a lie works like this. Each episode, we start with you guest it two truths and one lie about the topic

Jackie:

two things are true. And then the one thing that is a lie

Ella:

Then listen to the podcast and see if you can determine which are the truths and which is the lie

Jackie:

And parents. If you haven’t already pause the podcast, head over to parent busters.com and download the free Buster deduction sheets that you can use with each podcast. It’s actually in a buddy Buster’s kit and it doesn’t just have the free deduction sheets. It also has, uh, some fun activity sheets. It has your own, uh, science experiment sheets that you can do and some cool coloring sheets and you know, lots of cool things. So, uh, get it. It’s free over on parent buster.com

Ella:

Upgraded. Anyway, on the Buster deduction sheets, there’s a place where you can write down the two truths and a lie for this topic. Guess your answers before you listen and write down other fun things you earn during the podcast. Woo.

Jackie:

I’ll give you our two truths and a lie today you’re in is made up of a large percentage of water. Number two, fresh water. Rinsing is better than urine for a jellyfish sting. Hmm. And number three, urine is not sterile.

Ella:

Wait doesn’t don’t people always say urine sterile.

Jackie:

A lot of people do and you’ll have to listen to the end to find out if that’s true or not. I hope you already know if it’s true or not, but

Ella:

I, I do. I do.

Jackie:

So write those down. Remember, there’s a little space on your Buster deduction sheet. You can write down what they are and if you think it’s, uh, true or false, and then you can check off if you’re right at the end. Okay. Hey, do you want to hear a joke about P

Ella:

Uh, yes.

Jackie:

Urine for a treat? That … wasn’t the joke.

Ella:

Okay.

Jackie:

Why was the sand wet?

Ella:

Uh, I’m scared for the answer

Jackie:

Because the Seaweed

Ella:

really

Jackie:

Sorry.

Ella:

I’m being very salty. Ha ha get it. That’s

Jackie:

No laughing bladder.

Ella:

Well, at least you’re on the right tract. Get it. No. Huh. Urinary tract. I tried.

Jackie:

That was actually good. And over my head. Okay. So this episode actually came about because I was believe it or not an adjunct professor at a college. Wow. Back in the day. Well,

Ella:

If you can believe it.

Jackie:

And I, what was that?

Ella:

Yay.

Jackie:

And I at healthcare classes, and one of the things that I taught was anatomy and PHY physiology. And I told Ella that I used to tell my class that if you are in an emergency, you can drink your own pee to save yourself. Don’t try this out. But is it true? I mean, yes, I did used to say it.

Ella:

College professor telling lies to their class.

Jackie:

Well, let’s find out, well, first let’s talk before we get into, if you can really drink your own pee. And by the way, once again, we’re gonna tell you, don’t try this at home. Please is just something that, uh, you’ll find people talking about for survival situations. Like if you’re dehydrated and you don’t have any liquids or fluids, you can drink your own P and we’re gonna tell you in a little while, lots of reasons why that’s a bad idea and it doesn’t really work. But for now, uh, let’s talk a little bit about what your P is made of. You want to,

Ella:

Yes.

Jackie:

So urine is a byproduct that’s made when the body filters out your waste and some extra water from your blood and that’s called Ure. Ah, but P is actually made up of water, salt electrolytes, like potassium phosphorus, and then chemicals like Ure and uric uric acid. But according to Winchester, hospital, ancient medical and cultural practices in Egypt, China, India, and the Aztec empire, they did consider drinking urine, uh, as a treatment or cure for a variety of elements. And they went as far as to say that these treatments supported and cured things like acne, indigestion, migraines, wrinkles, and even they believe that even it cured, even cured, serious diseases. Oh boy. The way you have to remember is that urine is a waste product. That’s, that’s why your body’s getting rid of it. Yeah.

Ella:

It’s, it’s something that filters through your kidneys and comes out. It’s something that your body doesn’t mean. That’s

Jackie:

Right. It’s good. Rid of all those things, including bacteria gross, that isn’t good for your body,

Ella:

Which is why you shouldn’t drink it. Right. Especially not in a survival situation. Right. There’s actually a few reasons why you shouldn’t drink it in a survival situation. One, it is not stereo sterile. Like we just said it has back bacteria and no, you can’t really filter it to make it drinkable. All of the like bad things are too small to be filtered out and even using like chemicals or UV lights will only kill some of the stuff in it.

Jackie:

And if you’re in a survival situation, I’m gonna guess that you don’t have anything to sterilize your pee or, or a UV. Like it’s just a guess.

Ella:

Exactly.

Jackie:

So even though I think one of the reasons that people think that you can drink your urine. Well, not everyone I guess thinks that, but, um, water is made up of about 91 and 90%, 6% of your urine, but it still contains all of those unhealthy bacteria and toxins. So it’s not sterile, even though there’s a great deal of water, it comes through your body. It’s not sterile if you’re stuck in an emergency, oh no. In a spot where you want to drink, you’re in a place that’s so serious that you’re gonna wanna drink your own pee because you haven’t had any fluids. Guess what else? Your body’s dehydrated. And you’re not going to be producing a lot of urine because you’re already dehydrated.

Ella:

Yeah. And another thing is pee has a lot of salt in it. So think about if you’re, you don’t go and drink things out of the ocean, you just don’t drink salt water. That’s gonna dehydrate you more. The, the urine does the same thing. Not only does it not help with hydration and actually dehydrates you

Jackie:

That’s right. Um, a quote from healthline.com says drinking urine when you are dying of dehydration would be the same drinking sea water, only yuckier urine contains concentrated salts and minerals to process salt. Your kidneys require a certain amount of water to compensate for increased salt intake. You’d have to pee out more water than you take in from urine. And this would actually accelerate the dehydration process, the us army field manual specifically instruct soldiers not to drink their own urine in a survival situation.

Ella:

Yeah. They actually have a do not drink list. Oh. And that also not only includes includes P but also blood.

Jackie:

You must be.

Ella:

I feel like that’s pretty obvious, Right?

Jackie:

Unless you’re a vampire, I guess

Ella:

It is. I guess that’s true.

Jackie:

Pretty obvious.

Jackie:

even though it might make sense to you because you don’t have any other liquid, if you’re in a survival situation or anything else to rehydrate you, the temporary benefits of taking in the water from your urine are going to the, the risks are going to far out, outweigh the benefits. And it’s kind of like a last ditch efforts and it actually, um, will start to make your kidneys, uh, shut down because you’re just putting more toxins back into your body while you’re dehydrated. So

Ella:

Dude, it’s just not worth it

Jackie:

Drinking a small amount of pee.

Speaker 4:

Don’t try this out. It’s

Jackie:

Not gonna kill you.

Ella:

You can do,

Jackie:

Don’t try this at home

Ella:

At home. Don’t try this at home. You can do it. If you’re healthy, you can possibly safely drink your own pee, but why? Yeah.

Jackie:

Yeah. And it’s not going to save you in an emergency situation. So think we can say that’s myth.

Ella:

I think that is that

Jackie:

Wives tale that goes around

Ella:

That is busted.

Jackie:

All right. So another thing that you hear often when you talk about pee, because doesn’t everyone just talk about pee all

Ella:

The time. I mean, yeah. Normal, normal things to talk about, especially as a teenager, you know, just going out to my friends like, Hey, so, uh, urine

Jackie:

Ha yeah. You’re healthy. Is your pee healthy today?

Ella:

Oh yeah. It’s good. How’s urine. You. That’s just the

Jackie:

Other thing that, uh, you hear people and I, um, actually believed this. So this is a learning curve for me. I guess people say that if you’re at the beach and you get done by a jellyfish, if you pour urine on it or have someone pee on the sting, then it will help with the jellyfish sting. And we found out, well, you all probably already knew. So I’ll just say I

Ella:

Found including, including me, Because Is

Jackie:

It true that if you get stuck by a jellyfish, you should pee on it.

Ella:

No, no. Like, have you ever watched Adam ruins everything he covered? They covered that in that I feel like that’s originally where I was like, oh,

Jackie:

Well, okay. I have to tell you back in the day, there was also a friend’s episode. Where’s Monica got stung by a jellyfish. So I’m just saying,

Ella:

And you trust my advice from friends. How, how long

Jackie:

Ago

Ella:

Did that show come out?

Jackie:

Healthcare professors get their healthcare information from friends. Anyway, listen, Uh, you shouldn’t pour urine or have someone pee on your jellyfish steak. And there are actually lots of other things that you should do with your jellyfish thing, because I guess this is the part, I didn’t know. It can reactivate the Mattis from the, uh, jellyfish. So anyway, here’s what I’m trying to say. According to the Cleveland clinic, jellyfish tentacles have steaming cells called the Matty and they contain, contain venom. And they activate that activates. When the jellyfish shoots you, oh, peeing on the sting actually causes these cells to release even more venom.

Ella:

And you know what else? Cause it causes it to release more venom scratching it. Oh, it’s like a worse mosquito. It’s just like, which

Jackie:

Seems like that would be a normal reaction was to, would be to run your or hand over it.

Ella:

Yeah. Run your hand over touching it. We’ll just react it. Even trying to wash it off with like fresh water, like tap water. Don’t do that. That’ll make it so much worse.

Jackie:

Okay. So the things that you should do and shouldn’t do, if you get stung by a jellyfish, don’t have your friend Ponic

Ella:

Or your somehow, huh? Let’s not get into that.

Jackie:

Uh, you should remove the barbs that from the NEMA, remove those with tweezers. You already said don’t rub or scratch.

Ella:

Don’t rub or scratch. Don’t put fresh water on it.

Jackie:

Okay. Don’t wash them with fresh water. You should actually take some of the sea water and rush and wash them out.

Ella:

Or sometimes vinegar,

Jackie:

Fresh water like bottled water or tap water can cause the NEMA to release even more V oh no. And then you can put apple cider vinegar or rubbing alcohol on the affected area. You can soak it on hot and some people do have serious reactions to it. So be sure to seek medical attention. We’re clearly not giving you any medical advice here. We’re just providing information. You might wanna have somebody look at it, take a look at it.

Ella:

Uh, in a quote from the scientific american.com. Uh, they’re talking about what you should do once you Rente an deactivate, all the NEMA PMA. So once rinsing deactivates all the nasty, the pneumas place in which the venom stored the attached bits of tentacle can be removed by coat them with shaving cream or slur of sea water and sand followed by shaving with a razor or a credit card. It’s like shaving. That’s just because of the jellyfish.

Jackie:

So where did, where do you think the peeing on jellyfish sting myth came from?

Ella:

Honest to goodness. I have no idea.

Jackie:

Be careful. I, I had a hard time finding it too. And there was a site that that’s called ocean syrup and they said that it’s honestly just, they have a bunch of science things on there and it says it’s just a basic misunderstanding of science. And when I read this, I was like,

Ella:

Yeah,

Jackie:

People think that because we use vinegar or the ammonia for the ammonia of a jellyfish sting that the ammonia and P works the same way. So it was kind just a leap between fluids and science, I guess. I don’t know. Ocean syrup states the idea behind that is right. It’s why we use vinegar. Jelly stage vinegar is acidic and helps to neutralize the pain. And while ammonia is acidic, there’s barely any N R P. So for every 100 milliliters of urine, there’s 0.05 grams of amonia, which in science, science is known as, not nearly enough to do anything.

Ella:

Did you write this

Jackie:

Does sound like something I would write, but we also wanna tell you, you don’t just have to worry about the live jellyfish. If you see a jellyfish, that’s dead on the beach, be careful. Don’t touch them. Don’t play with them. Because even when they’re dead, their tentacles, their NEMA can still trigger. And so they can still basically sting you when they’re dead. Oh,

Ella:

That’s, that’s coming back with vengeance. Uh, okay. Moral

Jackie:

Of the story.

Ella:

Don’t pee on jellyfish

Jackie:

Stings. Don’t just stay away from jellyfish, uh,

Ella:

Speak. Okay. Speaking of jellyfish, I jellyfish fact. Okay. So there is a little jellyfish called the mortal jellyfish. If you’ve heard of it, have you, I have not. You haven’t. Okay. So

Jackie:

I love when you get excited. When I say I have it, I don’t know something that

Ella:

You have. I know cuz then I can talk more.

Jackie:

Wow. Oh wow.

Ella:

So the mortal jellyfish, anytime it gets hurt, it can revert back to its young age and grow up against like revert back to its baby form and grow up again. So it’s basically can’t die.

Jackie:

It never dies.

Ella:

Don’t believe so, huh?

Jackie:

We’re gonna look up more about that information and put it in the episode. Learning after listening post over on our website, if you didn’t know, we have a whole section called learning after listening. One of the things that we do is that we, uh, note some of the things that we said in the podcast that we didn’t know the answers to, but, and then also we include a bunch of other things for every single podcast we do. There’s a matching learning after listening, uh, blog posts. So head over to parent busters.com to see it. And we not only fact check some of the things that we say. Sometimes we include more information. If there were things that we didn’t know, but we also have lesson plans. We, you resources, we give you books to read. So every single topic that we talk about on here has an equal learning after listening

Ella:

All the interest and stuff,

Jackie:

All the cool stuff. Anything else you wanna say about peeing? Jellyfish?

Ella:

Wait, do jellyfish pee. Oh wait, hold on. If they got stung by human, would jellyfish pee honestly,

Jackie:

Come on.

Ella:

We’re getting met out

Jackie:

Here so we can put that to bed. Don’t pee on your stings.

Ella:

Don’t pee on your jellyfish stings or any sting that just be weird. Just

Jackie:

Don’t pee on yourself. Why can’t you hear a Tara DLE go to the bathroom?

Ella:

Cuz it has a silent pee

Jackie:

Because the pee is I live.

Ella:

Hey, Is that

Jackie:

It? Why do my jokes crack me up more than they crack you up? Huh? That’s probably something to explore.

Ella:

Isn’t it? Because every time I make a joke around anyone else, I’m the only one laughing. So

Jackie:

That’s not true. I laugh at your jokes all the time. Oh you mean the important people that you’re around

Ella:

The other are people. Wow. Not the okay. Let’s

Jackie:

No, let’s just move on.

Ella:

Moving on.

Jackie:

The last thing I wanna cover about pee, cuz I mean 20 minutes of talking about your is probably right up there with the fired episode.

Ella:

Oh yeah. Exac. Oh, if you haven’t listened to that check that I out.

Jackie:

Yeah, we have it’s

Ella:

A, a blast.

Jackie:

It’s it might stink. I don’t know.

Ella:

No, it doesn’t stink.

Jackie:

The other thing is something that my mom used to tell me. Oh. And we all know that we’ve talked about it before. Uh, my, my mom was a treasure trove of wives, tale to else when I was growing up. One of the things that we used to do is in our backyard during the summer, my dad would make us a campfire in the backyard. We weren’t allowed to play in it, but we got to gross marshals or

Ella:

Hots. Yeah. That makes, that makes sense

Jackie:

Or whatever. But the reason I’m saying that we weren’t allowed to play in it is because if my mom caught me like poking a stick in it or whatever, guess what she would say to me, what Don’t play with that fire you’ll pee the bed.

Ella:

How does that work?

Jackie:

I have no idea, but it was a thing. So I asked your dad a couple of days ago if, when he, you know, who’s just a couple years older than me. So we grew up around the same time period. Uh, if they had that saying when he was growing up, he grew up in a different state and he was like, no. And he thought I was so I’d like to know if you have heard, don’t play with fire or you’ll pee the bed. And maybe it’s a Southern thing. I don’t know. Remember my parents are both Southern, so

Ella:

Could definitely be a, it seems like the south is just full of amazing wise tales.

Jackie:

That’s and we love the south. Don’t get strong. It’s our, that’s our heart. Yeah’s awesome. But I don’t know if it was a Southern thing or if it was, um, my parents thing,

Ella:

It could be,

Jackie:

Uh, when I did some, it wasn’t just my parents because when I did some research, people did talk about,

Ella:

I, I tried to look up the origin of that and all I got was like Reddit. And I was like, no way, am I using Reddits? Yeah. As a liable resource. So, um,

Jackie:

Yeah,

Ella:

Apparently it’s a thing

Jackie:

I looked and looked and there were some websites that were, uh, kind of cataloging wives, tales that people or folklore things that wait their families. Yeah. There were people on there that did record this as one of the wives, tales, folklore, myths, whatever that parents used to tell them. That’s true. And almost everyone said the same thing that no one knows where it came from, but all of us are guessing that it was just a way for our parents to get us, to keep us safe, to get us not to play with them.

Ella:

Yeah. Yeah. It’s smart.

Jackie:

The only thing that I could find again, that some people did share that it was folk or in their childhood, one site mentioned that it, they thought it came from Japanese folklore. Another mention it was Norwegian folklore and there were more than one person saying, oh no, this is definitely a Southern saying,

Ella:

That’s probably the highest likelihood

Jackie:

Of. So beyond that, I, and I spent a significant amount of time trying to do background research for where did the first don’t play with fire. You’ll pee the bed come from. That’s true. So if you know this, please come over to Facebook or Instagram or Twitter and let us know. We’re parent busters on all those sites. And uh, let us know if you either, either heard that or if you know where it came from, because I would love to know personally, but playing with fire, doesn’t make you pee the bed. Nope. We don’t really know where it came from. To be honest.

Ella:

No, it would, I don’t really see why it would make you pee the bed. Maybe just like making you feel relaxed.

Jackie:

Huh? But when you’re a little kid, you don’t think of that. You just, I mean, what’s the most horrible thing ever to do in front of your friends is to pee the bed at like a sleepover. Right? So if you’re having a campfire while your friends are over and your mom tells you you’re gonna pee the bed, that be mortifying,

Ella:

That would parenting

Jackie:

Woohoo.

Ella:

10 outta 10. Let’s

Jackie:

Talk about one more thing for P you want to

Ella:

Yay. Yay.

Jackie:

The enthusiasm

Ella:

Palpable. Yay.

Jackie:

Uh, what about, does asparagus really cure pee smell?

Ella:

I don’t know.

Jackie:

Do you have you heard this before?

Ella:

I have,

Jackie:

This is another one of those things that people say that eating asparagus makes your peace smell. That’s the color and smell of your urine can tell a lot about what’s going on with your body. Like if by the way,

Ella:

Why you pee, why you smell and you pee well,

Jackie:

Have it. You ever taken a medication and then peed and then it has a different odor than,

Ella:

I don’t know. I don’t document that in my brain. No. Do you? Well,

Jackie:

I’ve been around on this earth a lot longer than you. So maybe I do. But when you’re sick or when you’re taking certain medications, what about vitamins? Haven’t you ever taken a different vitamin? Sometimes the concentration of that vitamin makes your urine smell different.

Ella:

I don’t know. You’re just gonna leave. I don’t know, honestly.

Jackie:

All right. So all of those things can make your urine smell. Even if Ella can’t smell it. But if, even if you’re not drinking enough water, like you’re dehydrated and also things that you eat can change the look and smell of your pee.

Ella:

Oh, that’s

Jackie:

Just any guesses on what color? Uh, your healthy urine should be

Ella:

Relatively clear.

Jackie:

Yes. So a pale yellow to a pale gold.

Ella:

Okay.

Jackie:

Generic, fun fact.

Ella:

Yay. Yes.

Jackie:

Your P gets its color from a pigment in your body. That body makes and it’s called. You’re a Chrome,

Ella:

Huh? I know you’re you’re a Crow. It sounds like

Jackie:

Day on the parent Buster podcast, learning things that you can use in real life. Every day on the parent Buster podcast,

Ella:

It sounds like a transformer. You’re a Crow. You’re a, a talk trademark, copyright, trademark it, whatever.

Jackie:

Okay. Uh, according to web MD, hear what the different colors of your PE mean. Yeah. And then we’ll get to, to the part about, does asparagus really make your pee smell and look differently? Light PE means that you’re probably drinking a lot of water. Whoa. So that’s a good thing. It means you’re re you’re. You’re probably hydrated. Your body’s probably doing what it’s supposed to be doing. Dark gold pee can be you’re dehydrated

Ella:

Gross.

Jackie:

Yeah. So if you’re ever going to the bathroom and you see really dark gold pee, it could mean that you need to drink more water.

Ella:

I guess it does seem like when you’re dehydrated. It P is thank you.

Jackie:

I guess. Oh, now you wanna jump on the urine bus.

Ella:

I didn’t agree with that. I didn’t know about the things you were saying then, but this I do,

Jackie:

Uh, what a pinkish to red pee can mean a lot of things actually, but it can also mean, and I didn’t know this, that eating things like carrots, blackberries beets in rhubarb can all give your urine a pinkish to red tint. Huh? Huh? I didn’t know that. So does asparagus make your peace smell?

Ella:

Does it, it,

Jackie:

I don’t know. You wanna take a guess before

Ella:

We get I’m gonna, I’m gonna guess. Yes.

Jackie:

Okay. So normal, healthy P doesn’t have a smell again, but if you’re taking vitamins medications, you may notice that your P has a smell. And according to the Cleveland clinic quoting when asparagus is digested asparagus, asparagus, a acid gets broken down into sulfur containing byproducts. Sulfur.

Ella:

Oh no. Not sulfur

Jackie:

In general is not very pleasant to smell. When like

Ella:

In your farts,

Jackie:

When the pee, when you pee the, the sulfur byproducts evaporate almost immediately, and it causes you to smell that unpleasant pleasant smell. Yeah. We talked a, a lot about, uh, sulfur in the farting episode too. Again, this, these could go hand in hand parents. You should just listen to both of these episodes today. You’re

Ella:

Welcome. Get

Jackie:

All of the body, uh,

Ella:

The body fluid

Jackie:

Odors out of the way. Yep. But this, this is also interesting. So the Cleveland clinic also reports 20 to 50% of people experience asparagus pee. For those who don’t get to cower the joy of asparagus pee, they believe the reason might be, there might be two reasons for this. Everyone digests, uh, food differently. So some people break down that sulfur more efficiently. And some people lack the ABI to detect the odor because of genetics.

Ella:

So like you can’t smell, but other people might be yes. Oh.

Jackie:

So either your body efficiently breaks down the sulfur from the asparagus more efficiently and you just don’t have that asparagus peace mouth, or it could be that your genetic are causing you not to be able to smells

Ella:

Unbeliev that that’s scary.

Jackie:

Asparagus can make your peace smell, but you might not be able to see it to smell it just based on how you react

Ella:

To I’d be concerned. If you could see it

Jackie:

Well might be neon green. You never know. Hey, I nose. I have another joke.

Ella:

Yay. Yay.

Jackie:

What do you call kids who pee after the age of 12

Ella:

Teenagers?

Jackie:

Teenagers?

Ella:

Is that it?

Jackie:

That was it.

Ella:

Yay.

Jackie:

So I think we’ve covered enough things about P today.

Ella:

You got enough urine jokes.

Jackie:

I CA I came with urine jokes. We were re yours

Ella:

Adlib.

Jackie:

All right. So join us next time. And don’t forget to head over to parent buster.com where there’s more learning after listening and we will see you on the next

Ella:

Episode. Wait, we didn’t answer the two in a

Jackie:

Line. Oh yeah. What would I do without you?

Ella:

I don’t know. Not have a co-host

Speaker 5:

True.

Speaker 6:

Fred would be your cohot

Ella:

Cat. That’s in here while we’re recording.

Jackie:

He’s the judgey one on the front page of the parent busters.com website. Could

Ella:

It not leave us a nice

Jackie:

Review? No, he left us a really bad review. So you’ll have to head over and see what it is. So here are the answers to our two truths and a lie for this episode. Number one, urine is made up of a large percentage of water.

Ella:

That’s true.

Jackie:

Number two, fresh water. Rinsing is better than urine, better than urine for a jellyfish sting.

Ella:

That is incorrect, cuz they’re almost equal and rinsing. Right?

Jackie:

And you’re supposed to use seawater,

Ella:

Seawater or vinegar.

Jackie:

Um, number three. Urine is not sterile.

Ella:

That is true.

Jackie:

That is true. So they’re your two truths and all I don’t forget to write them on your Buster and we’ll see you on the next episode.

Ella:

Yeah, I have. We have to go. We both really have to pee now. It’s true. After, after talking about it.

Jackie:

It’s true. See ya. Bye. Hey, thanks for listening. If you like what we’re doing here, please leave us a five star review. So Ella knows that our homeschool research didn’t go to waste. We use also. So we are parent busters on Facebook, Insta and Twitter. So join us over there

Ella:

Too, but not on TikTok because someone said I can’t be on TikTok right now.

Jackie:

That is correct. Hey, you know what else? Parents head over to our website. Parent busters.com. Wow.

Ella:

How original or

Jackie:

Wow. But did you just say how wow, how original? No, yes. That’s right. Our website is named exactly the same as our podcast.

Ella:

Yep. Parent busters.com.

Jackie:

Um, anyway, parents head over to parent busters.com because there’s more learning after listening. We have a ton of ideas to go along with things you heard in the podcast in fun. As you can continue learning with your kids together.

Ella:

Wait, wait, wasn’t there a printable or download you want to tell about,

Jackie:

Oh yeah, that’s right. Uh, thank you. Problem. There’s also a download parents that you should head over to grab before you even listen to any of the podcasts. It’s the printable Buster deduction sheet and it’s from our bud, our buddy club. I don’t know why I can’t get that out. It’s just like a ton of bees or something.

Ella:

It’s a tongue twister.

Jackie:

Anyway, it’s a printable Buster deduction sheet, print this out and your kids can write down their guesses on the topic. And uh, there’s a space in there for the two truths in a lie that we do before every podcast. Then you’re gonna listen to the podcast together and then you can document any facts you learn. You can, uh, right now the two truths in a lie that you find out. And there are, uh, lots of other things that you can do with those deduction sheets. So head over and check it out. It’s

Ella:

Free. Yeah. It’s really fun.

Jackie:

Join us for our next podcast. We would tell you when they are, but we really don’t know right now. We’ll figure it out though.

Ella:

And we’ll let you know when we figure it out. If we figure it out, we’ll probably figure it. I don’t know. I hope

Jackie:

We figure it

Ella:

Out. I really hope that it, this recording time would just go to ways. All

Jackie:

Right, we’ll see you guys on the next episode,

Ella:

Have a good, uh, whatever insert time of day. It is. Bye.

We hope you enjoyed the urine podcast: Urine In Trouble Now Podcast Episode and learning fun facts about pee!

     
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Jacqueline Wilson, the mom half of the Parent Busters Podcast, is also the founder of Homeschool Super Freak (named a top 15 BEST Homeschool Site), a professional educational consultant and writer, former award-winning college professor, educator of 18+ years, homeschooling mom of over 9 years, and #1 Bestselling Education Author. She's been featured in local and national news and media outlets. She loves rescue pets.